SHARC Byte News

February 1998


HAM OF THE MONTH

The ham of the month is Frank Haskins, KE6LHX. As our new neighbor and club member he has jumped in and become a great asset to our club. Frank is now an Advanced Class Amateur Operator. He has already helped with some emergency communications, Field Day, and many other aspects of the club’s responsibilities. As a new resident to our area, he has adjusted to the life style on the north coast and has helped many including your fledgling editor with very good "input" for our Newsletter. Frank has brought a much needed "Morning Commute Show" to the 146.790 repeater. This is now a welcomed addition for the folks commuting between the bed and the world! I like to start my day by saying hi to all my ham friends and enjoy a chance to talk before the boots get busy.


HAMS IN SERVICE

Once again Dan, WD6AOJ, was just the "ticket" for Jim, KJ7QT, who got stranded on Hwy 1 north of Fort Bragg. I was not monitoring the 145.430 repeater, but Dan was and answered. Dan called back east to the car dealer and got help rolling to Jim. KJ7QT was very grateful to have the help that one can find in this remote area. This is another example why to have your radio with you at all times and to try to encourage others to get the ham license. Thanks Dan Bonnie, KE6QQE, found a car broken down on bad corner and called for a tow truck, I think her son , did the landline footwork. As can be expected, they had no one that could respond that evening to tow the car, but just then a friend of Bonnie’s came by and pulled it to a safe place. Thanks to ham radio, another situation is solved. Thanks Bonnie.

If one were to count the times that Jack, KM6TE, spends working on our repeater system as a Ham in service he would be in this section every month! Thanks Jack. Do you have a story of a ham in service that you would like to share? Just send it to me.

Cory Allen

PO Box 273

Redcrest Ca. 95569

Packet BBS: KN6ZU@K7WWA.#NCA.CA.USA.NOAM

Packet Mailbox: On 145.050 KN6ZU-1


Dues and other correspondence goes to: Southern Humboldt Amateur Radio Club
S.H.A.R.C.
P.O. Box 701 Redway, Ca. 955603


BREAKING NEWS!

I just found that the N.W.S. , ( The National Weather Service) at Woodly Island, Eureka now has a packet station! Thanks to the forever famous Jim, KA6OQJ. you now can connect to KA6OQJ-2 or KA6OQJ-3 for the mailbox on the Island in the bay. Congratulations to Frank, KE6LHX, is now an Advanced Class License Holder. I also am glad to say that Joe KA6ROM, is now a General Class License holder!

I will tell you the why next month, but for now there could be a change in the frequency to the BBS in Willits. George wrote me and told me he plans to change the LAY node to 144.310mhz and the MENDO node will move to 145.690mhz. This is a good move for reducing collisions and is needed for other reasons that will be discussed in the February Issue. This change could take place as soon as January 31st of 1998! Spread the word. Jack, KM6TE, Working on the tower.

The picture was taken by Frank, KE6LHX.


PART 97

The section this month we will deal with Station Control. I don’t mean the 55 gallon trash bin you dump all the junk that seems to find its way into your ham shack, or your radio controlled train set, I’m talking about Parts 97.105 (a), 97.109(e), 97.115 (b) . These are in reference to what should be considered noteworthy in the rules that govern the use and setup of a phonepatch system. They are rules, so you should familiarize yourself with them as they apply to all aspects of your use of ham radio.

Part 97.105 Control operator duties. (all)

(a) The control operator must ensure the immediate proper operation of the station, regardless of the type of control.

(b) A station may only be operated in the manner and to the extent permitted by the privileges authorized for the class of operator license held by the control operator.

Part 97.109 Station control (all)

(a) Each amateur station must have at least one control point.

(b) When a station is being locally controlled, the control operator must be at the control point. Any station may be locally controlled.

(c) When a station is being remotely controlled, the control operator must be at the control point. Any station may be remotely controlled.

(d)When a station is being automatically controlled, the control operator need not be at the control point. Only stations specifically designated elsewhere in this part may be automatically controlled. Automatic control must cease upon notification by an EIC that the station is transmitting improperly or causing harmful interference to other stations. Automatic control must not resume without prior approval of the EIC.

(e) No station may be automatically controlled while transmitting third party communications, except a station transmitting a RTTY or data emission. All messages that are retransmitted must originate at a station that is being locally or remotely controlled.

Part 97.115 Third party communications. Subpart (b) only

(b) The third party may participate in stating the message

where:

(1) The control operator is present at the control point and is continuously monitoring and supervising the third party’s participation; AND

(2) The third party is not a prior amateur service licensee whose license was revoked; suspended for less than the balance of the license term and the suspension is still in effect; suspended for the balance of the license term and relicensing has not taken place; or surrendered for the cancellation following notice of revocation, suspension or momentary forfeiture proceedings. The third party may not be the subject of a cease and desist order which relates to amateur service operation and which is still in effect.

Whew! What a sentence! My view on this part is that you have to be "In control and monitoring at all times if there is a "Third Party" on the ham bands AND they better not have been in any type of hassles with the FCC or have any hassles pending with "their" FCC license or a cease and desist order relating to ham radio. No automatic control on third party traffic makes a difference in how you will have to approach the phonepatch concept.

Ah, do I smell an Auxiliary station warming up?

Now for the Hard part. We are not near done with this topic! That’s right, if you plan to make a simplex autopatch there are rules. If you plan to be a mobile control operator, you get more rules. To give you a jump on next month’s set, look at Part 97.213(a) Telecommand of an amateur station.

I like this set as it governs my activity from the earth’s surface to 50 kilometers above the earth! Have they been reading the Helium filled trash bags and the flying lawn chair story?

Part 97.201 Auxiliary station. Oh yes friends, this is some heady stuff coming up!

For those of you who are thinking of talking from your space station, don’t worry, you can just read all of Part 97.207 and relax in the fact that "Any amateur station may be a space station." Of course there are a few extra rules to go along with your space junk! Until next month , 73 from Cory @ 2743 feet.


HUMOR

The HAMNECK guy is recovering after the little something went wrong with his re-entry, though the modified car coil springs did help some. I thought this would be a good time to discuss why I never spend enough time in the Laundromat. After all we can spend countless hours staring into a small display waiting for that rare chance to make that DX station or local repeater. And why shouldn’t I be able to take a few rides in the dryer? I paid my quarter and there is no sign. The only sign I’ve seen is "Don’t dye here!" from some bad speller. I guess that’s a warning about how long it will take to get your clothes dry. I really think the main radio makers could use these dryers for a standard shock test device not the stringent Military specs. And who decided that the military should set any standard other than the highest price ever paid for an ash tray? I think I’ll make a screen saver that looks like clothes in a dryer and make a million. What is it about clothes going round and round and a small radio display that has such a captive audience? Oh you might be a hamneck if you ever saw your HT going around and around...There are you happy? Ok one more, you might be a hamneck if you are petitioning for a worked all phone prefixes award. People I’m dying here! Les send some more jokes! Hi!


AIR WAVES

Well the idea of having Frank as the Ham of the month was conceived in December, so either someone tipped him off or is quite telepathic! Either way I’m glad to add this......Sent to me over Packet Radio I might add.......

KE6LHX 29-Jan-98 18:40 Reflections

Hi Cory. Maybe you could use something like this in the NL. Hope it is not self serving. I don't mean it that way. I am going to attend a meeting at the CHP tomorrow and will try to make a report. Jack asked me to fill in for him.

..................................................................................................

Reflections from a new Ham in the area

Hi. My name is Frank Haskins and my callsign is KE6LHX. My wife, Irmgard, and I are new to the area. We moved from Sylmar, Ca. to Garberville in October 1996. We lived in Sylmar for 35 years before pulling up and moving! Why did we move? I think it was the fires, earthquakes and the King and Simpson trials and riots. That and the graffiti all over the place. What a change! Although we still have some problems here, not a drive by shooting or two everyday.

What do I think of the area? Well, I may be able to take a vacation in 10-20 years as I think I'm on vacation. I hope to start fishing and maybe do some hunting. The past year we were busy with the house and property.

One thing we are having to get used to is the RAIN. We don't mind rain but not all at once. I read we have had about 50" already this year! LAX gets that much in about 3-4 years. We have a beautiful new home in the meadows east of Garberville and have a lot of work to do as far as trees, plants, grass, stabilizing the ground, etc. I however have started planting antennas and they are doing very well! We do miss our daughters and four grandchildren. Shaun, the oldest started at USC last fall and his brother Brian, (KF6FNT), is a junior in high school. We did have the two youngest, Brittany 12, and Brandon 10, up last August.

I became a Tech in July 1994. Passed my Tech+ in December 1995, General in December 97 and Advanced in January this year. Marcia Ebert sold us the property and Allen, her husband talked me into getting my license as the local club had an open repeater with phone patch for additional communications up here. Ken was also a lot of help as we would see him on our many trips through the area. I joined the club before moving here and was getting the news letter down south. I think the club has a lot to offer old and new Hams alike. I would like to see more Techs try the 5 WPM code and get some HF privileges. It was hard for me but 5 WPM now seems slow. I still have a problem at 13 WPM.

I think I am adapting to the small town attitude but slowly. I have learned to listen more before I state my opinion. One thing I miss is getting items when I need them and not having to wait from a few days to a few weeks to have items shipped in. I don't think I could live as remote as Cory or Buck. I have met a lot of good Hams and they have made my transition easier.

Thanks all. I guess I could say " I never met a Ham I didn't like". 73 Frank

................................................................................................. Frank is a welcome addition to our group of hams and the Ken he talks about is Ken, KE6WC.


PACKET NEWS

Where to start this month is the easy part. The Conference hosted by Jaye, KE6SLS, was a fantastic adventure into the complex world of setting up packet in all its forms. Jaye had demonstrations set up on TCP/IP and was talking to Hams from around the world. George, K7WWA, took the floor for an easy and understandable explanation of what was the start of packet in this area, what is here now and how we might achieve our new high speed gates and still keep others that use 1200 baud happy. Like a lot of projects, it will take time, money, and support. I, KN6ZU, kept stressing the fact that we as a ham group have had a virtual "free ride" when it comes to packet. We have let Les, N6AFT, George, K7WWA, Joe , KA6ROM and Rich, WB6MYF, foot the bill for the costs of building and maintaining these expensive systems. They have been glad to do it and never asked for any help. Now the time has come that if you would like to see all the exciting new applications, such as TCP/IP, faster 9600 or 19.2 baud rates, H.F. gates, I-net gates, E-mail , then you will have to help support the system changes. It might be labor, money, equipment or writing grant proposals, but it is time to help this system or you may very well see a very fun and important aspect of Ham radio dwindle and die. Why should the entire Ham community support Packet radio? In the event of a major disaster, normal data transfer systems will fail or be overloaded. If the proper packet systems are in place, every area would still have E-mail, I-net access through neighboring systems. By the shear numbers in realm of a major disaster, one must consider the role digital communications plays in the relief efforts. Maybe you have no interest in packet, but have a relative or two that would want to here from you via e-mail should the phone lines go out. Maybe you have an old tnc that you are not using or you have been thinking that a $20 bill is what you would like to contribute. If we have a huge disaster, Packet will effect every aspect of the reporting and relief efforts in and out of this area. I hope to have it set up that any donations can be sent to the various clubs and be routed for packet funding only, if that is your wish. We have many people that are willing to "Elmer " or "Walk" you through the whole world of packet radio whether or not you have ever touched a computer before. With some of ham friends, I have never heard their voice. There is something very different communicating around the world and not speaking. A quiet place to talk. If hams want QSL cards from all over the world , just go to the K7WWA BBS and type a CQ DX WW bulletin and get a bunch of postage stamps because you’re going to need them! If you want a crowd to talk to, just type GBV and then type T for the "Talk Room" ! FOT in Fortuna, is on 050 taking up the slack of having no EKA node at this time. Thanks Les, N6AFT and John, KB6ZJS. REDMEM is no longer on the air. ( A story in itself.) 73 From


HAM EXAM

On Feb 22, at 1200 Ross Hill Road in Fortuna, Ca. The code testing is @ 1230pst and the written at 1400pst. Call Paul, K6KGA @ 725-2045 for details.


EDITORIAL

In my opinion, editorials are for others and not just me to give "input". With that in mind, that is the editorial! Was that applause I heard? Hi!


SCENARIO

What if you are driving along and come to the scene of an auto accident? Would you have a Plan of action? Do you have a fire extinguisher? Do you have first aid supplies and first aid knowledge? What if it’s raining? Do you have some trash bags for temporary shelter from the rain? A blanket and flashlight? It’s always smart to get on the radio as soon as you approach any accident and let people know your location and that you are going to investigate. One may have some time before the rescue equipment comes. Do you have and know how to use flares? Are there any people causing the situation to be more hazardous? As much caution as we take about our own driving habits, we still have to consider that each of us may have to be a "Ham in Service". One will avoid much heartache if one can walk away and say " I am glad I prepared myself for this." Many lives have been saved by the quick thinking , well prepared individual. In winter, one may easily have to spend a night between the slide and the downed tree. Won’t you be glad you have that thick wool blanket in your emergency gear?


HEARD THE NEWS?

Radio Frequency Exposure Guidelines

The FCC has issued guidelines for Human exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields. All amateurs must comply with these guidelines as of January 1, 1998. The regulations are listed in the FCC's OET Bulletin Number 65. The complete text is available on the FCC's OET Web site at:

<http://www.fcc.gov/oet>. But it's 150 pages!

The limits specify two classes of exposure. Those where persons exposed know of the danger, like the amateur and his family, and those who are unaware, like a neighbor or someone walking by.

The specification limit is higher for those who are aware of the danger. The regulation lists Electric Field Strength, (Volts/Meter), Magnetic Field Strength, Amps/Meter), Power Density, (MilliWatt/cm) and Length of exposure. That's a lot of variables! What it means is more power, distance from the antenna and length of time determines the limits. The amateur must perform a RF evaluation when power (watts) exceed the following:

WAVELENGTH/BAND POWER EXCEEDS (WATTS)
160-40 Meters 500
30 Meters 425
20 Meters 225
17 Meters 125
15 Meters 100
12 Meters 75
10 Meters 50
VHF (6-2 Meters and 220 MHz) 50
UHF 70 CM (440 MHz) 70
33 CM (902 MHz)  150
23 CM (1240 MHZ) 200
13 CM and above 250

Repeater Stations (All Bands)

Basically Height of Antenna < 10 Meters and Power > 500 Watts if non-building antennas.

Power > 500 Watts if building mounted.

As you can see from the above most amateurs in our area do not have to do an evaluation. If you exceed the power limits on any of the above frequencies you are required to do an evaluation. But look at the limits at 10 Meters through 220 MHz. Most HF rigs run 100-120 watts and some amateurs have amplifiers on 2 Meters that put out more than 50 watts. You will be required to do an evaluation!

I will do more research on the new regulation and assist anyone that would like my help. 73 Frank KE6LHX


MINUTES

( Sent to the Packet BBS in Willits!)

From : KF6KBU

To : KN6ZU

Type/status : PN

Date/time : 07-Feb 09:33

Bid : 4865_K7WWA

Message # : 135937

Subject : SHARC Club Minutes for January 1998.

Here is the rundown Cory.

Meeting opened at 5:42 at the Humboldt House Inn.

Officers for 1998 are: Leland Smith, W6CLG,President; Frank Haskins, KE6LHX, Vice Pres.; Jack Foster, KM6TE,Treasurer; Teresa Green, KF6KBU and Kristen Vogel, KE6KKE, will share the job of Secretary. There was talk about forming a nomination committee to change the way we elect officers. Nothing was decided at the meeting. Future discussion may follow at another meeting. Smitty announced we need to upgrade the 450 antenna on the repeater. The present antenna is a double-dipole and is 15 years. old.

Motion to replace the antenna was made by Joe, KA6ROM. Second: Dan Gribi, WD6AOJ. We will have Jack investigate the best prices and costs for connectors and coax for the system. Smitty presented a sample Sharc Club membership certificate and courtesy card that Todd Phillips created.

Everyone present thought it looked good. Smitty discussed whether or not we can change the dues for 1998 because the

dues for the club are set up in our by-laws. He thought maybe we would have to change the by-laws to reflect a change in dues structure. An ad-hoc committee will be formed to research the by-laws. The following consented to form the committee: Dan Gribi, Jerry Wilson, Frank Haskins, and Leland Smith.

Cory has proposed a change in our Monday night net contest. A small discussion came up but nothing was decided upon at the meeting. Smitty, however, proposed that we have a prize like a dinner or gift certificate for the end of the year instead of a radio.

The Clubhouse is being sold and all equip. has been moved out. Smitty has some of the coax and misc. items, Jack Foster has equipment, manuals and magazines. Frank Haskins has the table and Dan Gribi said he would store the tower at his house. No new clubhouse has been found or chosen at this time.

Joe, KA6ROM brought in a roster he is trying to complete with SHARC Club members with names, phone #'s, addresses, etc. The list was passed around so everyone present could update the information. (This roster will only be available to SHARC Club members).

The club has outdated "Now You're Talking" books, should we buy new ones? (The book teaches you everything to get your no-code tech license) The only difference in the new books are the RF questions. No decision.

If we continue to meet at the Humboldt House, we will have to do so at 5:30.

Many ideas were talked about meeting at other places in town. Nothing was decided. Some of the places were: Grange Hall, Veterans Hall (which everyone liked) but Jack also had some ideas and we will wait until he returns to make a decision. Listen up on the radio before the next meeting in case the location and time of the meeting will be changed.

Shalley is willing to come to our meeting and give a seminar on antennas. (What a nice offer!)

Smitty reported that at the Harc club, a proposal came up about forming an umbrella group to include all Humboldt. co. clubs for insurance purposes.

(The following is from Rain’s newsletter about the umbrella group)

The idea of the UG is to form a collective tax exempt organization for local radio clubs in the county of Humboldt. By forming such an organization, the group would be able to seek out grants that would benefit all clubs in that group. However, nothing has been decided, more investigation is necessary. Monday night scenario. Dan Gribi presented a Mon. night scenario to publish which may make it easier for new people to follow. So, we could get others to call the net. The scenario was passed around. And a few suggestions were made.


The following is Dan's preamble.

QST, QST, QST, this is (Name), (callsign), (location), net control for tonight's Southern Humboldt Amateur Radio Club Monday night net. This net meets every Monday night at 1900 hrs local time on the SHARC repeater system, which includes

the 146.79 repeater near Garb. which is linked to the 146.94 repeater above Shelter Cove. Everyone listening is encouraged to check in and participate in tonight's scenario, immediately following the net. Also, everyone is encouraged to be net control of this net in the future.

... Is there any emergency or priority traffic on frequency?

... Check-ins will follow: When checking in, please check in with your callsign phonetically followed by your name and location. If you want to break in with emergency traffic, a relay, information, or query, break in with your callsign

only.

...Are there any mobile stations wishing to check in?

...Any stations on emergency or alternative power?

I will now take check-ins geographically starting with:

...Garberville and North.

...West of Garberville.

...South of Garberville.

...East of Garberville.

...Any late check-ins in any area?

... any last minute announcements?

...any volunteers to be net control next Monday. night?

I am now closing the net - please stay on freq. for tonight's scenario..

...SCENARIO.

...Are there any QST's, bulletins, items for sale or trade, or any other announcements for the net?

Well, Cory this is the end of the minutes. I think we need better organization at meetings with announcements of new bus, old bus. etc. Oh well, who am I? haha... (Well, Teresa is the kind ham that took time to put this on packet to me that’s who!)

73. Teresa...k

=== End of message #937 to KN6ZU from KF6KBU======


WIND AND RAIN

The start of February has been a very wet and windy month. In our area this is nothing new. The Fact that the cellphones, fax, and other communication systems held up was a blessing. I know that at least 2 local repeaters were out, but the hams picked up the slack by networking on simplex. For the first time I can remember the 146.790 SHARC Club repeater may have been damaged by static from the stormy weather. Most of the hams in our club responded on 146.790 SIMPLEX and others knew to monitor the "input" 146.190 to broaden our ability to respond to others not aware of the 79 repeater being down. Smitty, W6CLG, and Frank, KE6LHX, went up the hill and after determining that it needed more than a quick fix, brought it off the hill. This type of mishap helps everyone know that even without any repeaters, we can get the job done!

"It’s really very simplex to do!" Hi!


REDNECK HUMOR

You can thank Les, KE6KKJ for this slant on confusers.

Hard Drive = Trying to climb a steep, muddy hill with 3 flats . Keyboard= Place to hang your truck keys. Window= Place in truck to hang your guns. Floppy= When you run out of Polygrip. Modem= How you got rid of them dandelions. ROM= Delicious when you mix with coca cola. Byte= First word in a kiss off phrase. Reboot= What you do when the first pair gets covered with barnyard stuff. Network= Activity ment to provide bait for your trout line. Mouse= Fuzzy, soft thing you stuff in your beer bottle in order to get a free case. LAN= To borrow as in, "Hey Billy Bob! Lan me yore truck." Cursor= What some guys do when they are mad at their wife and or girlfriend. Bit= A wager as in, "I bit you can’t spit that watermelon the length of the porch. Digital Control= What you do to the TV remote. Packet= What you do to a suitcase....

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

EMERGENCY RADIO USE

This was compiled for those who may have to run an unfamiliar stations at the fire hall, hospital, or are taking on a new station for whatever reason. This was first compiled for the hospitals in Humboldt County in January of 1997 and may not be current with the EC in your area.

1 - REMEMBER HOW YOU FOUND THE RADIO.

(freq, mode, & power)

2 - SPEAK IN A NORMAL, CALM, VOICE

KEEPING THE MIKE AT LEAST 2" AWAY FROM YOUR MOUTH.

3 - CHECK IN ON THE LINKED REPEATER SYSTEM. (146.760 Fortuna area, 146.610

Garberville, 147.000 Eureka & north or 146.910 for the Med Net emergency repeater) pl 103.5

4 - KEY THE MIKE AND SAY "Net control, this is (your call) at (your location), checking in" THEN

FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS GIVEN BY NET CONTROL.

5 - RECORD ALL INSTRUCTIONS AND CALLSIGNS IN A LOG BOOK.

6 - IF THE LINK IS DOWN, TRY 147.330 (V.I.P.)

mid-county Weott, 146.790 Garberville area, 147.445 Monument Peak, Fortuna area, 146.700

Eureka. That failing , try 146.520 Simplex on high power.

7- BE AS BRIEF AS POSSIBLE. PREPARE YOUR STATEMENT FIRST.

8 - IF YOU HAVE A LOT TO SAY, EVERY 40 SECONDS OR SO, SAY "Break" AND UN-KEY THE MIKE.

WAIT 5 SECONDS TO MAKE SURE THAT NO ONE NEEDS TO TALK.

9 - IF YOU HEAR "Break Break Break" , STOP TALKING AND LISTEN OR SAY "Go Break" , AND LISTEN. THE "Break Break Break" HAS PRIORITY OVER MOST CONVERSATIONS.

10- SAY "Break Break Break" IF YOU HAVE AN IMMEDIATE OR URGENT EMERGENCY. YOU STILL MUST FOLLOW NET CONTROL’S INSTRUCTIONS.

11- RECORD ALL CONTACTS WITH THE DAY, TIME, YOUR CALL, THEIR ALL, AND A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE CONTACT.

12- ALWAYS SAY YOUR CALL AT THE VERY END OF YOUR CONTACT. EXAMPLE: "I'm clear , kn6zu."

13- IF AT ANY TIME YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE TO DO, CONTACT SOMEONE WHO KNOWS, AND ASK AGAIN FOR INSTRUCTIONS.

(This can happen to anyone so don't be shy.)

14- THIS IS A GENERAL OUTLINE AND YOU SHOULD ALWAYS FOLLOW ANY SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS THAT SUPERSEDE THIS INFORMATION

15- RETURN THE RADIO TO EXACTLY AS YOU FOUND IT WHEN YOU'RE DONE!

(If you forget how it was, ask someone before you leave.)

16- GOOD LUCK AND THANKS!

This is only a outline and does not enclude any changes that may have occured in this area . As Always, Your "Input is welcome! 73 From Cory KN6ZU